EXPERIMENTS

Experimenting with architectural patterns (below)
 
IR_0399R23p5to32.jpg (402115 bytes)
Thermal images, like this one of a giraffe's legs, which shows false colors, from C23.5 (dark blue) to C32 (white) can be used by vets to help identify health issues.
Experimenting with perceived temperature ranges
 
There are three series of images in the three columns below. Each series is based upon a single original thermal image that has then been reinterpreted in a variety of 'false color palettes', by resetting the upper and lower limits on their temperature range. This has been done in a special piece of thermal image analysis analysis software, that can read the buried temperature data, hidden behind each pixel in the original captured 'thermograph'.

The lower to upper temperature range, in Celsius, applied to each image, is shown below it. 

On the left hand side, the false color range has been used to effectively recolor a 'pattern' created by the interplay between a building's windows and tree-branches in-front.

The middle column, of St Paul's Cathedral, shows how different ranges can allow different aspects of a building and its surrounding environment to be pictured.

The right hand column shows pictures of an okapi at London Zoo. Only the upper temperature changes in these pictures. As the upper temperature in the visible range steps up, picture by picture, it is possible to discern what parts of the okapi are registering hotter than this, as these parts show up white. 

Skilled thermographers (specialists in using thermal cameras) are able to make much finer temperature measurements in animals to aid many different types of useful diagnoses.

  
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8.5 to 20 
IR_1196StPaulsN50-10HC.jpg (472984 bytes)
Minus 50 to Plus 10 - Hard Color Scale

13 to 18
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9.8 to 15.8
IR_1196StPaulsN50-10.jpg (452430 bytes)
Minus 50 to Plus 10 - Rainbow Scale

13-22
IR_0878cAlt11p520.jpg (393671 bytes)
11.5 to 20

IR_1196StPaulsN40-20HC.jpg (472290 bytes)
Minus 40 to Plus 20 - Hard Color Scale

13-25
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12.1 to 18
IR_1196StPaulsN15-35HC.jpg (463546 bytes)
Minus 15 to Plus 35 - Hard Color Scale

13-28
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4 to 20.1
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Minus 15 to Plus 25 - Hard Color Scale

13-31
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5 to 14.5
IR_1196StPauls0-38HC.jpg (444580 bytes)
Zero Centigrade to Plus 38 - Hard Color Scale

13-34
IR_0878c.jpg (443387 bytes)
Original clean (of engineering data) image
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Minus 15 to Plus 25 - 'Ironbow' Scale

13-37
 
 
 
 
 
Architectural patterns as inspiration for textiles and graphics
 
Much as architects might refer to other architecture, art and the observations of past geniuses, such as Fibonacci, for inspiration, the built environment can be great inspiration for new textiles and graphics.

As stated on the More pages, the picture to the right, which is of part of One Canada Square at Canary Wharf, London, was adjusted and used as the source of a basic repeating architectural pattern (below, left). This basic pattern has then been manipulated to produce some of a potentially infinite number of variations, on the same pattern theme, which can be extracted from it.

Examples of what each abstracted pattern looks like across a larger area can be found by clicking on the images below

cIR_0823.jpg (483981 bytes)
 
 
 
 
If you click on any of the 'root' patterns above to see what they look look when they are tiled into a larger pattern, you will note that, as with all experiments, some work better than others. There are potentially an infinite number of ways that a single 'root' pattern, in this case a detail from the facade of a building, can be developed. Click here to get back to the patterns section or here to get back to the top.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Click here to get back to the patterns section or here to get back to the top of the page
 
 
 
 
 
 
Click here to get back to the patterns section or here to get back to the top of the page
 
 
 
 
 
 
Click here to get back to the patterns section or here to get back to the top of the page
 
 
 
 
 
 
Click here to get back to the patterns section or here to get back to the top of the page
 
 
 
 
 
 
Click here to get back to the patterns section or here to get back to the top of the page
 
 
 
 
 
 
Click here to get back to the patterns section or here to get back to the top of the page
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Copyright for all images and text resides with Steve Lowe/ Thermalcities, except where otherwise stated.

 

 Copyright 2008. All rights reserved
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